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    Anandnagar cross Road,Satellite, Ahmedabad-15
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Orthopaedic Doctor


(Dr vishal Desai)

Revision Total Hip Replacement

In knee replacement surgery, the damaged parts of the bones making up the knee, which rub together, are removed using highly specializedinstruments and replaced with metal and plastic implants.

In total knee replacement surgery, the parts of the bones that rub together are resurfaced with metal and plastic implants. Using special, precision instruments, your surgeon will typically remove the damaged surfaces of all three bones. The replacement surfaces will then be fixed into place.

Knee Replacement Surgery is recommended for people over the age of with a stiff, painful knee that makes it difficult to perform even the simplest of activities usually due to osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or traumatic injuries and fractures.



Total Knee Replacement

Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have already decided to undergo hip replacement surgery, this information will help you understand the benefits and limitations of total hip replacement. This article describes how a normal hip works, the causes of hip pain, what to expect from hip replacement surgery, and what exercises and activities will help restore your mobility and strength, and enable you to return to everyday activities.

If your hip has been damaged by arthritis, a fracture, or other conditions, common activities such as walking or getting in and out of a chair may be painful and difficult. Your hip may be stiff, and it may be hard to put on your shoes and socks. You may even feel uncomfortable while resting.

Candidates for Surgery

There are no absolute age or weight restrictions for total hip replacements.

Recommendations for surgery are based on a patient's pain and disability, not age. Most patients who undergo total hip replacement are age 50 to 80, but orthopaedic surgeons evaluate patients individually. Total hip replacements have been performed successfully at all ages, from the young teenager with juvenile arthritis to the elderly patient with degenerative arthritis.

When Surgery Is Recommended

There are several reasons why your doctor may recommend hip replacement surgery. People who benefit from hip replacement surgery often have:

Hip pain that limits everyday activities, such as walking or bending Hip pain that continues while resting, either day or night Stiffness in a hip that limits the ability to move or lift the leg Inadequate pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, or walking supports



Revision Total Knee Replacement

Knee revision surgery, which is also known as revision total knee arthroplasty, is a procedure in which the surgeon removes a previously implanted artificial knee joint, or prosthesis, and replaces it with a new prosthesis. Knee revision surgery may also involve the use of bone grafts. The bone graft may be an autograft, which means that the bone is taken from another site in the patient's own body; or an allograft, which means that the bone tissue comes from another donor.

DESCRIPTION

Although no revision surgery is easy or simple, there are different kinds of revisions. Sometimes only some of the parts need to be replaced and in other cases, all the parts need to be removed and the bone around the knee needs to be re-built with artificial bone. Below are a few examples of revison knee replacements:

RISKS


The complications that may follow knee revision surgery are similar to those for knee replacement. They include:

1.Deep vein thrombosis.
2.Infection in the new prosthesis.
3.Loosening of the new prosthesis.The risk of this complication is increased considerably if the patient is overweight.
4.Formation of heterotopic bone. Heterotopic bone is bone that develops at the lower end of the femur following knee replacement or
5.knee revision surgery. Patients who have had an infection in the joint have an increased risk of heterotopic bone formation.
6.Bone fractures during the operation. These are caused by the force or pressure that the surgeon must sometimes apply to remove the old prosthesis and the cement that may be attached to it.
7.Dislocation of the new prosthesis. The risk of dislocation is twice as great for revision surgery as for TKR.
8.Difference in leg length resulting from shortening of the leg with the prosthesis.
9.Additional or more rapid loss of bone tissue.



Unicodylar Knee Replacement


The goal of knee replacement surgery is to decrease pain and restore function. Although total knee replacement (also called "arthroplasty") is an excellent option for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, other surgical options exist. Patients with osteoarthritis that is limited to just one part of the knee may be candidates for unicompartmental knee replacement (also called a "partial" knee replacement).

Unicondylar Knee Replacement simply means that only a part of the knee joint is replaced through a smaller incision than would normally be used for a total knee replacement.Unicompartmental knee replacement is an option for a small percentage of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Your doctor may recommend partial knee replacement if your arthritis is confined to a single part (compartment) of your knee. Your knee is divided into three major compartments: The medial compartment (the inside part of the knee), the lateral compartment (the outside part), and the patellofemoral compartment (the front of the knee between the kneecap and thighbone).

Advantages of Partial Knee Replacement


Multiple studies have shown that modern unicompartmental knee replacement performs very well in the vast majority of patients who are appropriate candidates.The advantages of partial knee replacement over total knee replacement include:

Quicker recovery, Less pain after surgery, Less blood loss.



Total Hip Replacement

Whether you have just begun exploring treatment options or have already decided to undergo hip replacement surgery, this information will help you understand the benefits and limitations of total hip replacement. This article describes how a normal hip works, the causes of hip pain, what to expect from hip replacement surgery, and what exercises and activities will help restore your mobility and strength, and enable you to return to everyday activities.

If your hip has been damaged by arthritis, a fracture, or other conditions, common activities such as walking or getting in and out of a chair may be painful and difficult. Your hip may be stiff, and it may be hard to put on your shoes and socks. You may even feel uncomfortable while resting.

The decision to have hip replacement surgery should be a cooperative one made by you, your family, your primary care doctor, and your orthopaedic surgeon. The process of making this decision typically begins with a referral by y our doctor to an orthopaedic surgeon for an initial evaluation.

Candidates for Surgery

There are no absolute age or weight restrictions for total hip replacements. Recommendations for surgery are based on a patient's pain and disability, not age. Most patients who undergo total hip replacement are age 50 to 80, but orthopaedic surgeons evaluate patients individually. Total hip replacements have been performed successfully at all ages, from the young teenager with juvenile arthritis to the elderly patient with degenerative arthritis.

When Surgery Is Recommended

1.Hip pain that limits everyday activities, such as walking or bending .
2.Hip pain that continues while resting, either day or night.
3.Stiffness in a hip that limits the ability to move or lift the leg .
4.Inadequate pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, or walking supports

The damaged femoral head is removed and replaced with a metal stem that is placed into the hollow center of the femur. The femoral stem may be either cemented or "press fit" into the bone. A metal or ceramic ball is placed on the upper part of the stem. This ball replaces the damaged femoral head that was removed. The damaged cartilage surface of the socket (acetabulum) is removed and replaced with a metal socket. Screws or cement are sometimes used to hold the socket in place. A plastic, ceramic, or metal spacer is inserted between the new ball and the socket to allow for a smooth gliding surface.